ZERO Percent (0%) GDP for 6 weeks - China

ZERO Percent (0%) GDP for 6 weeks - China
8 Comments

The Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of China is at ZERO PERCENT (0%) and will remain there for at least 1.5 Months.  The output of manufacturing in China is now almost zero.   Supply-Chain disruptions are already taking place; Hyundai, KIA, and Nissan have all had to stop several auto-assembly plants for lack of parts.  Other companies are now beginning to feel supply disruptions. The USA will be hit very hard by this . . .

For EVERYONE ELSE in the world, this will translate into shortages of products.  

Here in the USA, we will be hit especially hard since so many companies moved their manufacturing OUT over the past fifteen years.  With the exception of food, the USA will see terrible product shortages.  As such, those of you who stay informed, should  stock-up NOW.  Don't wait.

 

Now that you have read this story, please COVER THE COST for what your visit cost this site by clicking one or more of the ads below which generates Advertiser revenue of two to three cents per click - no purchase necessary by you -- and helps offset operating costs for this web site.

When YOU read a story here, the web hosting company charges us for "data transfer / Bandwidth" to convey the material to you.  Without your help by clicking an ad below, this web site would be in danger of shut down from the data transfer charges.  Please click any ad below to offset the cost of bringing this news to you.

 

 

You must login to post a comment.
Loading comment... The comment will be refreshed after 00:00.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Occams Razor · 7 days ago
    The Chinese companies want to borrow from the Chinese Govt to cover this Force Majure, to the tune of 9billion, if they get the loan, then that would seem to indicate the Govt is optimistic, but inflation will go through the roof. If the Govt denies....then that will tell you that the Chinese Govt things they are toast.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    MakeReady · 7 days ago
    Let's see how those chinese tit sucking companies like this for their stockholders ..... dumbasses ...... companies that were stuck as slaves to parts for maintenance will just need some GOOD Ole Time maintenance guys , ya need a part, you make it, or fix the old part.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Bill craig · 7 days ago
    All of these comments assume that other countries will not get devastated with the WORLD pandemic like China is at the moment.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    jw williams · 7 days ago
    Its stupid to do business with a Communist country anyway. Duh !
    • This commment is unpublished.
      MakeReady · 7 days ago
      Thanks to the bastard gov/dictatorship/regime of the 'make believe pres.' clown commie turd , geez the color is right, O'Bozo.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Jared Passenger · 7 days ago
    China is toast for some time now. Many items will be quickly outsourced to other countries and manufacturers. China will lose many of the workers who know how to produce the items they make (or made) along with the task of trying to come back from newly established suppliers.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Gifford Rodine · 7 days ago
    Just replaced a cam shaft position sensor after the engine light came on in a 2013 GM product. I do my own auto repair. The replacement part was made in china. Those sources may dry up as all the other replacements for this part were made in china also.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Arthur VanArtsdalen · 7 days ago
      That relates to something I've been thinking. How many food processing plants won't be operating at full capacity when they have some small part fail and can't replace it? How many other industries will face similar problems? Just rhetorical questions of course, since no one can answer them at this time.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Paul Boyd · 7 days ago
    Hal
    doesn't China always shut down its manufacturing in the month of February ?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Maril · 7 days ago
      Yes and schools are closed also, Chinese New Year is a big holiday, perfect timing I’d say
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Grim · 7 days ago
      No, China doesn't shut down in February. However, during a normal year, they shut down for a few days in late January for the Lunar New Year, which can cause minor disruptions in manufacturing during February. However, what's going on now, is something entirely different.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Grim · 7 days ago
    Well, that certainly escalated quickly. Someone probably just read this and jumped out a window at Walmart headquarters.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      J.A. · 7 days ago
      That was awesome! I needed that!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      TSlinger · 7 days ago
      Heheh...but why pick on WalMart- they are only one and all the stores get their manufactured goods from China. I never understood why pick on only WM...Target is probably glad...as are a hundred others...must be ubiquity or something.
      • This commment is unpublished.
        Grim · 7 days ago
        We pick on Walmart, because they're the poster child for how companies should not be doing business. Also, they initiated their huge growth years ago, by promising that they would sell only American made products. A claim which turned out to be an ongoing, bold faced lie. Now, they do still sell American made products, but you're going to have to search though a lot of Chinese crap to find them. As for Target, they let pedos and perverts into their ladies restroom....'nuff said.
        • This commment is unpublished.
          Standing Wave · 7 days ago
          About 15 years ago, a neighbor of ours invented and manufactured a product here in the usa (a new kind of toilet paper holder - not earth shaking but still). They approached Walmart about selling it in their stores. Walmart asked if it was made overseas, and when told it was made in the usa, Walmart told them they would only sell it if it were made overseas. It was their strict policy. I've always wondered if it was a union-busting policy hangover, but I do not know.
          • This commment is unpublished.
            Grim · 7 days ago
            Sounds like one of their foreign manufacturers and/or importers had some sort of domestic competition limiting clause in their supply contract with Walmart. It was likely tied to a particular wholesale price point that Walmart negotiated with them.
        • This commment is unpublished.
          TSlinger · 7 days ago
          Yep! But oh man...you can't fight those battles. Mom n' pop have been forced out long ago and sadly ain't coming back. Companies do what's best for them as they have an obligation to make as much money as they can. That's any business...when "enough is enough" is adopted (as in a more leftist mindset) then the business gets swallowed up. It just is, but I know you know that. Anyway...I chuckled.
          • This commment is unpublished.
            Jared Passenger · 7 days ago
            You watch. Wal-Mart will quickly outsource items from other countries that are not effected by the virus. They have the contacts and money to do so. Other Mfg. plants and countries will jump at the chance. Taiwan, S. Korea Mexico and other countries will gladly fill in. China is toast.
            • This commment is unpublished.
              Grim · 7 days ago
              Oh, I have no doubt US retailers will be looking to other countries to make up the gap. However, given the incredible volume and variety of products produced in China, even several countries working in tandem would be hard pressed to make up the shortages. It would take them a significant amount of time and money to gear up the facilities to produce the products. Meanwhile, we'll be faced with shortages and price hikes here for maybe as long as a few years. Remember, China ramped up its ability to produce such volumes of products over the last 40 years, so they can't be replaced quickly. Personally, I'm quite willing to put up with whatever it takes to bring as much manufacturing home to the US and that includes paying higher prices, as long as the products return to the quality we once expected.